The Lincoln Project

New Facebook attack on Donald Trump

Keith Edwards told CNBC the anti-Trump group will use thousands of members on the social media platform to reach out to voters who backed Trump in 2016

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US PRESS GROUP

The Lincoln Project will launch a digital initiative this week to whip up support for Democratic nominee Joe Biden on Facebook, the super PAC announced Thursday.

Spokesperson Keith Edwards told CNBC the anti-Trump group will use thousands of members on the social media platform to reach out to voters who backed Trump in 2016. Edwards told the network the group has over 50,000 members on Facebook.

The group will employ a similar strategy to its advertising arm, targeting key battlegrounds like Arizona, Texas, Florida, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

The super PAC plans to launch the initiative, called The Lincoln Project Digital Coalition (TLPDC), Friday after a Zoom briefing with volunteers.

Edwards told the network the social media platform was ideal for the kind of outreach the Lincoln Project is attempting.

“We maintain an email list but Facebook groups operate as our central hubs or ‘virtual campaign offices,’ because they allow us to moderate participants, creating a more constructive gathering place,” Edwards told CNBC.

“Within those Facebook groups, we share our ads first, paired with data-backed talking points. Trump’s support is strongest on Facebook so given our target audience are Republicans, Facebook needs to lead our TLPDC efforts.”

The president and his campaign have spent more than $140 million on Facebook and Google advertising since the 2018 midterm elections.

The announcement comes days after the anti-Trump Republican group announced it would launch a veterans-specific coalition.

"Our veterans, service members, and their families know what a leader should be and have seen first hand how Donald Trump has failed his sacred duty as Commander-in-Chief," Fred Wellman, the group’s senior adviser for veterans affairs, said in a statement.

“[W]e are called upon to step up again and fight for our nation and volunteer at home to serve locally in our communities as poll workers and supporters when so many cannot because of their risks of illness,” he added.

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